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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
in detroit. thank you. >>> now the friendlier confines of the civic center. cbs 5 reporter elizabeth cook is with hundreds maybe thousands of fans. >> reporter: definitely a sea of orange and black here at civic center as thousands you said it right, fans pack in to watch their favorite team on the big screen. take a look at city hall. it's illuminated in orange. [ cheering and applause ] getting very excited here, we're in a commercial and they're getting -- amped up. we spoke to a couple of really loyal fans who got here late last night to make sure they had the perfect seat. >> exciting, torture. i've been biting off my nails so i don't have no more nails. >> you think it would be like really cold and boring but we were excited the whole time. we got maybe half an hour of sleep and we've been running on rock stars and energy drinks and it's fun though. it's part of the excitement. >> reporter: now we caught one the mayor -- up with mayor ed lee this evening and he just got permission from major league baseball last night that he could show the game here on the big screen. i asked a cou
. officials say they expect that number to double tomorrow. cbs 5 reporting and talking to passengers trying to reschedule. >> and we found out last night the flight to new jersey, trying to get to greensboro north carolina. >> dozens of flights from the west coast to the east are scrapped. the rescheduled process is low. >> set up my phone and put it on speaker phone and trying to get an agent. it sat there for two hours and 22 minutes. >> willing to see what we can do to make arrangement. >> in addition, many more are expected tomorrow and thursday when the storm really hits. the passengers don't know what to expect. >> and this group, at the end of the tour for young political leaders from all over the world much they have a presentation in dc tomorrow. >> trying to figure it out. we will go through through chicago and by chicago to north carolina and then to get by car to washington, d.c. >> and meantime, flights full of people who just escaped to the storm were arriving. >> yeah. , we split right underneath. it's great. >> as for what he left behind. >> our families back there, hopefull
media is doing. i'm reporting, not analyzing. but now i'll start analyzing. i listen to cbs radio every morning. it's usually pretty fair in its assessment of the news. but i knew when the economic data came out today cbs would report it this way. the labor department's october employment report, the last big reading on the economy before election day shows stronger than expected job gains. but more people were look for work last month and that pushed unemployment a tenth of a point higher to 7 .9%. still a pickup of 171,000 jobs is significant. economist stewart hoffman calls it the real deal. >> a good gain in jobs, a widespread gains, this isn't a fluke, it's a genuine improvement in the jobs market. >> in a moment lou dobbs will tell us if he agrees with that point of view. here is what is really happening. unemployment ticked up to 7.9%. however, there were more jobs available in october. in fact, the workforce rose by 578,000 americans. that's good. the reason unemployment went up is because more americans are now looking for jobs because more jobs are becoming available. the bad
, by the way. >> yes. >> it deserves the applause. >> and it was -- i was looking a lot at the history of cbs and nbc, the big two, but abc has started coming on strong and it became the third of the big three. how did abc news did on parity with nbc and cbs? what is the timeframe that that happened? >> abc news to everyone always says it was the fourth that of three. [laughter] for the 60's and 70's. it was a very weak news organization by all accounts. let's be clear. abc does the weakest of the networks as well. if you recall, there were to nbc network and nbc had a spinoff because they had trust concerns. so letter golden sun started building up the entertainment part of abc and to some degree successfully in the 60's and 70's. he concluded the only way to really get to parity with cbs and nbc was to build a great news organization, not so much because he loved news, but because the local stations made most of their money, as they do today, off of their newscast. he needed to improve. so he turned to abc sports, monday night football, while the world's ports and it said, you go over to ne
the prospect of yet another spell of bad weather. guy at cbs today asked me how i'm doing. i told him considering everything i'm just fine. and i meant it. one other necessary observation here. props and love to pepco. a while back i beat up on its president thomas graham after their sorry response to a storm. well, you guys surely did get it right this time. to tom graham and all the rest of pepco, way tgo. >>> charlie rose: will you endorse president obama? colin powell: yes. when he took over we were in one of the... worst recessions we had seen in recent times... close to a depression. and i saw, over the next several years, stabilization... come back in the financial community. housing is starting to pick up. the president saved the auto industry. and the actions he's taken with respect to... protecting us from terrorism have been very, very solid. and so, i think we ought to keep on the track that we are on. president obama: i'm barack obama and... i approve this message. would ban all abortions and contraception seemed a bit extreme. so i looked into it. turns out, romney doesn
schieffer of cbs news. the questions are mine, and i have not shared them with the candidates or their aides. the audience has taken a vow of silence -- no applause, no reaction of any kind except right now when we welcome president barack obama and governor mitt romney. gentlemen, your campaigns have agreed to certain rules and they are simple. they have asked me to divide the evening into segments. i'll pose a question at the beginning of each segment. you will each have two minutes to respond, and then we will have a general discussion until we move to the next segment. tonight's debate, as both of your know, comes on the 50th anniversary of the night that president kennedy told the world that the soviet union had installed nuclear missiles in cuba -- perhaps the closest we've ever come to nuclear war. and it is a sobering reminder that every president faces at some point an unexpected threat to our national security from abroad. so let's begin. the first segment is the challenge of a changing middle east and the new face of terrorism. i'm going to put this into two segments, so you'll ha
in the corpus area, and he won after a runoff by about 800 or 900 votes. >> cb solomon of -- solomon ortiz senior. >> that's exactly right. yes. but he arrived because first he was inexperienced in the ways of governance or politics at large. he arrives three and half weeks after everybody else did because of the recount, and so i followed a lot of these congressman around to get a sense of the irrational experience, and his was one of the kind of citizen politicians to try as you might can never quite catch up. always just sort of, you know, holding on to the medicine ball for dear life and never kind of getting a top of it. he was -- i mean, he told me he had this recurring nightmare that he was alone in his office and there was no furniture and only a phone that rang and rang and rang and he was never able to get it. he told a group of business lobbyists. you know you have that anxiety. dreams are really big. you know, that anxiety dream of going to school and looking down and not wearing your pants. you need to be the guys to tell me where my pants. the ones to tell me what things they
on walter cronkite. >> guest: a wonderful book. [applause] >> host: looking at cbs and nbc but abc came on strong and was 1/3 of the big three. how did abc news get on parity? what is the timeframe? >> abc news was the fourth thought of three. [laughter] it was very weak by all accounts. there were two nbc networks they had to spin off one but they started to build up the entertainment part. he concluded the only way to get to parity was to build a great news organization because the local stations made most of their money. so who created wide world of sports and the modern olympics said spend as much money as you want, which he did. [laughter] he built it up starting 1977 through the '80s by bringing in big stars. david brinkley, diane sawyer , ted koppel, he brought peter from overseas. he had barbara walters already. amazing graphics and was very aggressive. he built it up to a powerhouse. >> what was his personality like? >> guest: he was 18 yes. not in his demeanor. he was on the shy side and totally absent he never returned phone calls of anybody. at night you have a crisis there
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)